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  • 09 Jul 2013
    The Honeymoon Travel Blog (abc) SINGAPORE ARRIVED IN SINGAPORE: "Singapore seems to be alive. Blink and another building goes up. More offices, more shops, more businesses, more hotels, more new bars… It's mind boggling." After our three day Orient Express extravaganza we arrive in Singapore with a slight sway in our step - something akin to sea-legs. We hop in a taxi from the station and before we know it we've arrived at the Fullerton hotel, one of Singapore's finest establishments. Built in 1928 and famous as the one-time Post Office with 100-metre long counter (now a swanky bar), the Fullerton is instantly recognisable thanks to its white stucco-fronted columns and wedding cake look. I really like the slightly off keel colonial-meets-Asian atmosphere - white-clad bellboys and an original red pillar post box sit comfortably alongside a huge lobby pond where Koi carp swim for good Feng Shui. We're welcomed at the door and whisked up to our suite. It's gorgeous - and ginormous! The stunning duplex suite in golden creamy colours is flooded with light from the floor to ceiling windows, overlooking the South China Sea and the crazy new Marina Bay Sands treble skyscrapers (complete with Titanic-look-alike structure neatly deposited atop the three buildings, about 60 floors up). We have a beautiful mezzanine upstairs, with swanky bathroom (with that amazing harbour view), elegant furniture in golds, dark woods and Chinese prints, and even our own terrace wedged between the imposing façade's columns. If only we lived here. We could recline on the mocha velvet divan, invite lovely friends for a cosy dinner party and watch movies on the huge flat screen TV. This could be our dream apartment… For now, we'll make the most of it for 48 hours while we also try to pack in all of Singapore's must do sights. There's a lot on the agenda. Between an expat friend's recommendations, and wanting to go back to the places we last saw in 2003, we might be a bit ambitious. .. Nevertheless, we plan an action packed schedule, starting with a walk down Boat Quay, where at night the street is lined with bars and restaurants, from Penny Black's English pub to seafood eateries where you can see the creatures before they meet their demise - anything from grumpy looking eels (who probably knew they were edible), to giant crabs (the size of a small dog - seriously!), and other assorted sea/see-foods. Also on the list is a visit to Chinatown. We decide to walk there from the hotel but take a wrong turn and end up amidst motorways and building sites, easily done in Singapore. It might seem small, but it's deceptively big when you're on foot - and building sites are a dime a dozen. We negotiate traffic, hop over barriers and jaywalk - not usually recommended in a country with strict rules and regulations, but we have little choice. I wouldn't usually mind jaywalking, but I seem to recall that even chewing gum is illegal here. Indeed, where else could you find brand new flat screen TVs in the street, sleek digital displays and a spotless metro system without a piece of litter or graffiti to be seen? Eventually we find Chinatown, and walk around the Temple, Pagoda and Mosque streets. Since we did the temple thing last time we just browse the stalls selling everything from very intriguing looking food to jade trinkets, the eternal Chinese dresses, silk bags, paper fans and plastic good luck charm cats - a must have item we decide to invest in, choosing an 'eco-friendly' solar powered waving cat with a cheesy grin. I really do love shopping, but I can't quite believe how many luxury malls and designer brands there are in such a small square mileage! The abundance of Gucci and Louis Vuitton stores is amazing. It seems that everywhere we look in Singapore, there's a mall - SunTec, Orchard Road, Raffles City… It's torture for me! I suffer major shoe envy - those teeny, tiny sizes are no match for my size 9s - the eternal curse of the 6ft2 giant. Singapore seems to be alive. Blink and another building goes up. More offices, more shops, more businesses, more hotels, more new bars… It's mind boggling. Nevermind visiting the old heritage sites, like Chjimes or the famous Black & White houses, there's barely enough time to see all that's brand spanking new! We squeeze in a dinner at Lau Pa Sat, the authentic food hall where locals chow down on Vietnamese, Thai or Malaysian food, and order something that tastes pretty good considering we have no idea what it is. On the other end of the scale, we also make it to legendary Raffles. It's compulsory in Singapore. The cream meringue-like building with its elegant high ceilings, beautiful beams, detailing and antique furnishings is opulent colonial luxury at its best. To start off, we pop to the courtyard bar (which is really well hidden) with its intricate, white latticed balconies, and have a couple of drinks before dining at the gourmet Grill. Spoilt with amazing foie gras and chicken confit terrine and the Australian Waygu steak, we even allow the sommelier to twist our arm and try a Chateau Margaux 2005 - a real treat. I try to skip dessert but am foiled by the chef who insists we try his petit fours with a coffee. I love the freshly made fluffy 'guimauve' marshmallows and the financier 'finger' with its almond flavouring. For 'apres' we sneak up to the Long Bar for a Singapore Sling - also totally compulsory here. Be warned! The bar with its peanut shells on the floor, paddle fan ceiling system and smiling staff is so cliché it's like a movie set. I start chatting to the manager who turns out to be an ex-member of Transvision Vamp - You meet the most interesting people, in the strangest of places!The pink drink we've come to sample is extraordinarily sweet (apparently specially devised for ladies back in the day) so next time, I'm sticking to Cosmos. PREVIOUS: "Entering the Orient Express lounge in Hualamphong Station was the start to a journey in a parallel universe."   For more from Rowena, follow her @just_glorious - take a look at www.justglorious.com or her portfolio at www.carrallinson.com . For photography check www.frereimages.com  
    34647 Posted by I Lyn
  • 18 Nov 2013
    YouNet - SocialEngine Demo - View Video - Justin Bieber Babynice weekend for everyone >;)
    11685 Posted by I Lyn
  • 18 Nov 2013
    Although the world is full of suffering, it is full also of the overcoming of it
    3381 Posted by I Lyn
  • 10 Dec 2013
    It’s possible to dress up intranets with a lot of bells and whistles, but at the end of the day an intranet should do three high level things and do them well. A modern intranet is a smart and integrated system with an intuitive user experience that focuses on three high level things your employees care about most: — The official corporate and onboarding stuff from HR, Executives, Corp CommunicationsNews and information  Finding stuff — i.e., people, experts, information, knowledge and ideas that help people do their job  — You know, the “project” and “process” type stuff that actually drives your business, builds product or services your customers.Getting work done   The Modern Intranet is an Integrated ‘Hub’ It’s really that simple. I’m sure some will have their own view of things and add all kinds of complexity. Sure, you can throw in all kinds of buzzwords like crowdsourcing, talent management and operational efficiency. Yet a modern intranet needs to be ONE system that addresses all three things in an integrated, engaging and convenient (aka mobile), user friendly experience. It’s one system that actually delivers on the vision and promise of becoming a true hub for global communication and collaboration within the enterprise.   I Want That ‘Easy Button’ on Everything!!!! I don’t know about you, but I want that “easy button” placed all over my modern intranet, on every page, every UI and every device. It’s not because I’m lazy, it’s simply because the fast pace of business today has accelerated and the scale of information both inside and outside the enterprise has grown exponentially insane. When you think about that in terms of your intranet and what it represents to your organization, you begin to view the modern mobile intranet as a: Reflection of organizational culture Representation of the corporate brand Way to build community and connect people Digital representation of people and their reputation within the organization Way to align and engage a distributed workforce and service customers Hub for both communication and collaboration Central place where work gets done While I could on and on about all the wonderments and attributes of a mobile modern intranet, it’s better to address the things I don’t want in an intranet followed by the stuff that I do want. So here goes …   I Don’t Want … My intranet to be a “dumb directory” where people constantly dig and inefficiently hunt for information. An intranet that is disconnected to the various other systems I need to get my work done. No, I don’t want another system alongside the wiki tool over there, the SharePoint document library over here, a dropbox folder, email, a web meeting and IMs all over the place. To fill out a stupid form to submit a document into a document library with all kinds of “structured metadata nonsense” and with nested folder structures. One place where I have to find an expert and another place I search for information. An intranet that I can’t access on my mobile device. A tool that only allow me to microblog at work in 140 characters or less. “Facebook for the enterprise” with single activity stream full of more noise than most people’s email inbox. That good ole’ corporate intranet home page with all kinds of web parts neatly placed on a web page with sanitized information that someone else thinks I should know. Sorry, I’m just going to change my home page to something else anyway. Connect, contribute, share and learn from my colleagues anywhere from any device. Watch video blogs and get work done on my phone or tablet. Filter out the noise and subscribe to what matters most — the people, places and content that are MOST relevant to me and the job I am hired to do. ASK A QUESTION so I can get an answer to help a customer as quickly as possible. Search results to be personalized to ME and find people, places and content that are most relevant to ME! Receive smart recommendations so I discover things I didn’t know before. Easily target my communication to specific groups of people without emailing them. Track activity, actions, decisions and understand the CONTEXT of the work that was done later when I search for it. Have the system track the reach and sentiment of the messages I’m communicating. Relate content I create or consume or act on to KPIs and show my executives dashboards so they can see the effectiveness of strategic initiatives.   I Do Want To … Connect, contribute, share and learn from my colleagues anywhere from any device. Watch video blogs and get work done on my phone or tablet. Filter out the noise and subscribe to what matters most — the people, places and content that are MOST relevant to me and the job I am hired to do. ASK A QUESTION so I can get an answer to help a customer as quickly as possible. Search results to be personalized to ME and find people, places and content that are most relevant to ME! Receive smart recommendations so I discover things I didn’t know before. Easily target my communication to specific groups of people without emailing them. Track activity, actions, decisions and understand the CONTEXT of the work that was done later when I search for it. Have the system track the reach and sentiment of the messages I’m communicating. Relate content I create or consume or act on to KPIs and show my executives dashboards so they can see the effectiveness of strategic initiatives.   The Best UX Is Driven by People and Their Network Users want a simple, easy, frictionless, personalized, and intuitive experience. That’s right…I want EASY because we’re all so busy! The friction and ugliness of legacy intranets have proven no longer effective means for communicating and collaborating. Users don’t care about all wonders of a feature rich platform unless it actually adds value and utility to their day-to-day jobs and helps them create, innovate, market, sell, and service customers. Businesses are complex and change too rapidly for information to be communicated and delivered by pre-determined little parts on a web page or disconnected Facebook-like micro-blogging tools. The best user experience is one that is driven by people and their network within the organization. Source: http://www.cmswire.com
    1841 Posted by I Lyn

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Family & Home 1,044 views Apr 07, 2014
Paper flower tutorial

I thought some of you would enjoy a quick tutorial on how to make those little paper flowers I used as part of my table setting a couple weeks ago. The credit for these go to Martha Stewart (I saw this idea nearly 10 years ago in her magazine, but haven't been able to find it on her website). So here I go.. 

Step 1: Draw a spiral on a 4x4" square sheet of paper
Paper flower tutorial: step 1 

Step 2: Cut out spiral along lines you have drawn
Paper flower tutorial: step 2 

Step 3: Begin rolling up the spiral from the outside
Paper flower tutorial: step 3 

Step 4: Keep on rolling until there's no more left to roll
Paper flower tutorial: step 4 

Step 5: You're done!
Paper flower tutorial: done! 

I used a slightly heavier weight paper for this one, but you can use normal paper as well. You can use squares of various sizes to have different sized flowers. Besides sticking them on branches, they would be great scattered on the table as well. Heck, you can even make a little bouquet of them. Have fun! 

Untitled 

Note: You may use a bit of glue or double-stick tape to keep the flower from unrolling and loosening up with time. I didn't glue the ends for these specific flowers and they held up alright.